Heydrich-Wagner Agreement

According to research by German historians Klaus-Michael Mallmann and Martin Cüppers, an intervention group was established in 1942 to kill the half a million Jews in the British territory region of Palestine and the 50,000 Jews in Egypt. Egypt, which was ready in Athens, was ready to go to Palestine as soon as the German troops arrived. [48] Walter Rauff, leader of the SS storm, was to lead the unit. [109] Given its small staff of only 24 men, the Egyptian task force would have needed the assistance of residents and the African Corps to fulfill their mission. Their members planned to attract collaborators from the local population to carry out the murders under the leadership of Germany. [110] Former Iraqi Prime Minister Rashid Ali al-Gaylani and Jerusalem Grand Mufti Haj Amin al-Husseini played a role in playing anti-Semitic radio propaganda, preparing for the recruitment of volunteers, and setting up an Arab-German battalion, which was also to follow the Egyptian intervention troops to the Middle East. [111] Marshal Erwin Rommel`s African Corps Commander promised his corps` collaboration in these operations. [112] In an agreement signed in July 1942 between the two groups, Rommel promised logistical support to the Egyptian intervention troops, which were to serve under the command of the Wehrmacht. [113] However, the group never left Greece; the plans were shelved after the Allied victory in the Battle of El Alamein. [114] Over the past decade, research on the genocide of Jews in Eastern Europe has increasingly focused on developments in the “regional periphery” of National Socialist-dominated Europe and not on the decision-making process of the Berlin “Center.” This postponement led to an increase in the number of scientific studies studying the role of Eastern Europeans in the destruction of Jewish communities during the German occupation. [1] In particular, a book, Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland, by Jan T. Gross, sparked a firestorm in Poland in the debate over the complicity of Polish non-Jews in the murder of Polish Jews.

Writing that Poland, in Jedwabne and other small towns west of Białystok, participated in the murder of local Jews, Gross challenged the idea, long appreciated in Poland, that all Poles — Christians and Jews — had suffered equally from the Nazis. . . .

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